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Evening News
London, U.K.
2 November 1888

THE EARL OF SHEFFIELD THREATENED.

The Earl of Sheffield has offered a reward of 250 for the discovery of the author of an anonymous letter, which he has just received, threatening to murder his lordship. Lord Sheffield's announced intention of closing Sheffield Park (Sussex) against the public has created much ill-feeling.


THE EAST END MURDERS.

A PROBABLE CLUE.

KNIVES FOUND BY A POLICEMAN.

Considerable excitement has been created in Kensington owing to the discovery of two knives, one bearing stains of blood, in the front garden of a house in Harrington-gardens. The discovery has remained for some time a secret with the police, and has now only become known by mere accident. It appears that on the night of Sunday, October 21, a policeman on duty observed something bright close to some shrubs in the garden, and upon entering to satisfy his curiosity discovered a sheath containing two large knives, which are stated to be Ghoorka knives. An examination has been made, and it is asserted that blood stains undoubtedly exist on one of the knives and upon the sheath. These stains are probably a month old, but certainly not more than six weeks or two months. The knives are as sharp as razors.


A PARCEL FOUND IN HOLBORN.

THE REMAINS OF A PIG.

The Press Association says: A discovery, which was attended by strange circumstances, was made, last night, at the Windsor Castle public-house, in High Holborn. It appears that about nine o'clock on Wednesday night a man discovered a brown paper parcel, which, on being kicked, revealed its contents, comprising a liver, a portion of a kidney, and other fleshy substances. The man entered the bar and acquainted several persons present of the discovery, and subsequently a police-officer was fetched.

THE PARCEL WEIGHED TEN POUNDS.

The parcel, which measured about 12in. long by 6in. in width, is stated to have weighed about 10lb. One of the gentlemen present, who, it is understood, had a knowledge of anatomy, asserted that he had never seen anything more like human remains than those submitted to his view. The police-officer took the names of all those present and also examined their hands, after which the parcel was conveyed to the Tottenham-court-road Police-station. The contents were afterwards taken to the divisional surgeon, and subsequently to one of the London hospitals, to be examined.

THE REMAINS OF A PIG.

It is understood that the police have been informed that the remains are those of a pig, and not of a human being, as was at first supposed. A representative of the Press Association is informed that the police, on being acquainted of the discovery, attributed it to a practical joke on the part of some of the gentlemen present; but this Mr. English and the other men who were present indignantly deny. They assert that the parcel was not there ten minutes previous to its discovery, and that nothing was easier than for a person to pass through the house and deposit the parcel unobserved.

THE POLICE DENY IT.

The police, on inquiry, asserted "there was no foundation for the statement of the discovery, and that there was no truth in it." This latter statement is directly contrary to the assertions of Mr. T.H. Paris, the proprietor of the Windsor Castle, whose wife has been indisposed since, in consequence of the discovery.