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 Jack the Ripper: A Suspect Guide 
This text is from the E-book Jack the Ripper: A Suspect Guide by Christopher J. Morley (2005). Click here to return to the table of contents. The text is unedited, and any errors or omissions rest with the author. Our thanks go out to Christopher J. Morley for his permission to publish his E-book.

W.H. Eaton

Shortly after the murder of Mary Kelly, idle curiosity got the better of a young clerk named W.H. Eaton, of Fonthill-road Finsbury. Having perused the newspapers and finding little in the way of information on the latest Ripper murder, he decided to take a closer look at the actual location of the crime scene himself. He took himself to Dorset Street, and once there quickly realized that he could not get close to Miller's Court, due to the entrance being blocked by two stalwart policemen. He therefore instead began to question the bystanders, hoping to gain additional information not mentioned in the newspapers, and asked in an anxious manner if the bloodhounds had arrived yet. His behaviour and manner, however, soon alerted the crowd. Convinced that he was none other than Jack the Ripper. The howling mob began to follow him, causing him to run to Bishopgate police station. Eaton was questioned at the station, though quickly established his innocence and was allowed to leave.

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Related pages:
  W.H. Eaton
       Press Reports: Star - 10 November 1888