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The Two Republics
Mexico

17 December 1899

SWORN FOR TO CRIMINALS

CHIEF DETECTIVE OF SCOTLAND YARD RETIRES FROM BUSINESS

Henry Moore Was Long a Terror to London - Failure to Find Jack the Ripper His One Grief in Life.

(From the New York Press)
After thirty years of bright, hard work Henry Moore, chief detective inspector of Scotland Yard, has been retired. The story of his exploits and successes is almost a complete history of that famous home of England's criminal investigation department known to the public as Scotland Yard and to the nest of detectives themselves as C.O. - Central Office. Most detectives have a specialty in criminal calendar, or, perhaps, more than one, to which they devote themselves, and consequently do inferior work in lines outside their own, but Moore always did credit to himself in whatever work fell to his hands. He admits one failure, and that is that he did not catch Jack the Ripper. Still, there is some satisfaction to him in the thought that even if he didn't succeed in getting the fiend of Whitechapel no one else did any better.

"The police," says Moore, "were handicapped in their work. It was almost impossible to get anything like a trustworthy statement while every crank in England was sending postcards or writing on walls. The class of women we had to deal with would have told any number of stories for a shilling and it was impossible to believe any woman, owing to the hysterical state of fear they get themselves into. If we had tried to keep under observation the persons we were told were Jack the Ripper we should have needed every soldier in the British army to have become a detective. We have in the east end foreigners from every corner of the earth and when they hate they will tell such lies as will make your hair stand up."