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The Times (London).
21 January 1890

James Kendrick, 25, pleaded Guilty to a charge of obtaining 1d. by false pretences. On the evening of December 6 the prisoner was selling newpapers in the street, shouting "Another horrible murder and mutilation - Jack the Ripper at work again." The prosecutor bought from him a number of the Sun, and looked for an account of the murder, but was unable to find it. He pinted out to the prisoner that there was noithing of the kind in the paper, and the prisoner thereupon took off his coat and offered to fight him. The prosecutor called a contable and gave the prisoner into custody. On the way to the police station the prisoner threatened him, and said he would "act Phoenix Park on him when he got out." The prisoner said he was intoxicated at the time and "no doubt exceeded the news." Several previous convictions for larceny were proved against him, and it appeared that he had been liberated from prison only two days before he committed this offence. He was entenced to 21 days' imprisonment, with hard labour.