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Times (London)
4 August 1886

POLICE

At Westminster, Henry Love, 25, a private in the 2nd Battalion of Scots Guards, was charged before Mr. D'Eyncourt with violently assaulting Eliza Hanscombe by striking her in the eye with his fist in Grosvenor place. The prosecutrix, a cook, deposed that she was proceeding home last night with her two sisters, also in service, when the prisoner came up to them near Hyde park Corner and struck her a violent blow in the right eye, which was badly blackened. The soldier was the worse for drink, and said nothing at the time he struck her. She fell in the road and was rendered almost insensible. Prisoner said he was not the man who gave the blow, but the two sisters of the prosecutrix gave evidence identifying him. The pay sergeant of the prisoner's company said he had a fair character, but was riotous when in drink. Mr. D'Eyncourt said he supposed he was half drunk and did not know what he was doing. He should fine him 20s and 20s costs, which, if paid, would be some compensation to the poor woman for her injury. In default, prisoner would be committed to the House of Correction for a month.