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Reno Evening Gazette
Nevada, USA
12 February 1892

A Paris "Ripper"
By cable and Associated Press

Paris, Feb. 12.
The city is much excited over a new murder mystery, in presence of which the police confess their powerlessness.

An old woman, between 60 and 70 years of age, was found murdered yesterday in her wretched lodgings in the Rue de Rombuteau, a populous street facing the central markets, where there is a great collection of vagabonds in the early morning hours.

The woman was discovered lying on the floor of her bedroom, with at least twenty terrible knife wounds in her back and sides, as if she had suddenly been attacked from behind.

The first news of the murder was given by an old man named Guickon, who occupied the rooms with the woman. He came in toward evening and stumbled over the body. He was arrested in suspicion of some part in the tragedy, but easily proved an alibi.

Robbery could have been the only motive, apparently, for the deed, though the woman had been only 25 sous at the time of the murder. These had been taken, but the police think that if they wait long enough they will discover that the real motive was vengeance. The good wives of the quarter, who are eminently excitable, believe that a Jack the Ripper has arrived among them.