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Irish Times
Dublin, Ireland
Tuesday, 16 October 1888

THE WHITECHAPEL MURDERS
(BY TELEGRAPH)

LONDON, MONDAY

Two persons are at present in custody in connection with the Whitechapel murders. The report that an important clue had been obtained through the discovery of a bloodstained shirt left by a suspected character in an East End lodginghouse had no better foundation than an incident which was satisfactorily explained over a week ago. A petition to the Home Secretary asking for additional constables for Whitechapel, signed by about 200 shopkeepers, will be presented shortly by Mr Montagu, M.P.

Thomas Conway, who formerly lived with Catherine Eddowes, the woman murdered in Mitre square, called to-day with his two sons at the detective office of the city police, and was identified by Mrs Phillips as her father. The failure of the police to find him hitherto was, it seems, due to the fact that he drew his pension from the Royal Irish Regiment in the name of Thomas Quinn. He stated that he left Eddowes in 1880 in consequence of her intemperate habits, which prevented them from living comfortably. Had since met her occasionally in the streets, but had avoided her as much as possible.