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The City Press (London)
Wednesday, 21 November 1888.

The Rev. W. Rogers offers two suggestions with regard to the terrible state of things brought to light by the recent tragedies at the East-end. One is, that the class of women known as "unfortunates" should be registered, and, if needs be, licensed. The other is, that should there be a house-to-house visitation, the visitors being in correspondence with the various philanthropic societies, who would render assistance for rescue and relief. The first is no doubt open to many objections, for while it would clear the streets and protect the women from such murderous assaults as have recently been committed in solitary places, it would cut off almost every chance of return to the path of virtue, and would, in a sense, legalize vice and enthrone immorality. The second suggestion is worth more consideration, and could be at once put in operation. I think, however, the work of visitation and rescue is more fit for women and men, and certainly it ought not to be entrusted to the police, as Mr. Rogers proposes.


Related pages:
  Prostitutes
       Press Reports: Pall Mall Gazette - 06 October 1888 
       Press Reports: Star - 12 October 1888 
       Press Reports: Star - 13 October 1888