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Brooklyn Daily Eagle
New York, USA
14 October 1890

WANTED TO KILL WOMEN

Terrible Threats Made by an Englishman Probably Insane.

At 6 Rivington Street, New York, is a lodging house, with a restaurant on the first floor. A short, stout man entered the place today and called for a cup of coffee. He startled the landlady of the place by declaring he wanted to kill all the women in New York. To the only waiter the place could afford he talked familiarly of Whitechapel, and then in a sullen manner began to watch two girls sitting at another table.

As the girls got up and went out he hissed after them: "Beasts!" Then turning suddenly upon the woman at the desk, who was there alone, he said:

"Oh, I hate your sex! I could cut you into shreds, stamp you into jelly I will murder you all, see if I don't." A few minutes later and while the waiter and his employer were coming to the conclusion that their visitor was Jack the Ripper a couple of girls rang the bell of the lodging house and went upstairs.

"The wretches," the man yelled, springing to the door. "I will cut their livers out." He rang the bell and the manager responded, but would not let him in. There is a chair on the door and the stranger was left fuming on the sidewalk. He went across the way into a saloon at No.5 and, calling for a drink of whisky, ensconced himself at the window to watch the restaurant. The saloon keeper heard him muttering and asked him what was the matter. The man growled that he was going to kill all the women across the way and clean out the house. He got tired of watching at last and went toward the Bowery.

He was not drunk. That he was crazy is certain. It is equally certain that he was armed and vicious enough to do murder. After he went away a Western union letter envelope was picked up in his seat with the name Walter D Handley on it. In pencil is scribbled on the envelope the addresses of the Norwich Union insurance company, at 61 Wall street, with the note: "Friday morning, 11:45 a.m." under, and the firm name, Parker & McIntyre, 206 Produce building, with several Philadelphia and other addresses. The man was an Englishman.