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Stephen P. Ryder
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Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 11:06 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Recently came across this article, which describes an inmate at Broadmoor who seems eerily similar to James Kelly. Both men were gardeners at the asylum, both had failed escape attempts just before they died, and perhaps most tellingly, the article was published just three months after James Kelly died in September 1929.

There are of course differences - this man was said to have been at Broadmoor for 30+ years (Kelly was only there 1884-1888 and again 1927-1929), and he was also said to have been a doctor (which Kelly most certainly was not).

If it is James Kelly being discussed here, I would think this would add at least a bit more weight to his candidacy as the Ripper.

__________________________________________________

John Blunt's Monthly
16 December 1929

OUR JACK THE RIPPER
Sensational New Disclosures


THE interest aroused on the Continent in regard to the German Jack the Ripper has increased daily, but so far nothing has happened to equal the state of panic which reigned in London, and indeed throughout Great Britain, after the series of Jack the Ripper murders more than a generation ago. During the closing years of the last century woman after woman was discovered in the streets of London, mostly in unfrequented thoroughfares of the East End, brutally done to death.

There were several striking peculiarities about these crimes. The victims, in most cases, had been seen alive only a very short time before they had met with their shocking deaths, showing that the murderer was extraordinarily nimble in getting away after committing his foul crimes.

There was a remarkable similarity, too, in the way the women were murdered. Expert evidence showed that they were all mutilated in an abominable manner, but in a way which indicated great anatomical knowledge on the part of the perpetrator. In fact, it was generally agreed that the man must have been a doctor or medical student - albeit of great strength. Numberless clues were forthcoming, but they all culminated in barren disappointment. The police were baffled at every turn.

Practical Jokes

Numerous letters and postcards were received by different persons in London - sometimes relatives of the victims - the trend of some of them showing that the writer was a diabolical creature devoid of all human feelings, simply gloating over his bloody work and priding himself on his freedom from capture. Some of these communications were doubtless practical jokes; indeed the police were responsible for the statement, perhaps a true one, that they were all hoaxes, their aim being to allay the alarm felt throughout the country.

Soon the belief spread that every murder in the country at this time was committed by Jack the Ripper, although to the experts this was a demonstrable impossibility.

Still, when all was said and done, the murderer, so far as the public knew, was never caught and therefore never punished. This apparent failure of justice was considered a severe reproach to the authorities.

A short time ago, however, new light was thrown upon the identity of the murderer by a man released from Broadmoor, whose story is now published for the first time. The narrator, who lost no opportunity of disseminating what he had learned in the asylum, had completely recovered his reason, as will be understood by everyone familiar with the firm custody imposed upon the criminally insane.

Guilty, but Insane

During his stay at Broadmoor he learned many interesting things, and among them he gathered full details of the man who was known in Broadmoor as Jack the Ripper. This individual had been there for more than thirty years. He was a quiet, well-behaved man of great knowledge and culture, famous for his love of scientific books, and his fondness for diagnosing the ailments of persons with whom he came into daily contact. The warders used to point out the similarity of his characteristics with those of Jack the Ripper. Their explanation was that this man was actually caught by the police after one of his terrible crimes, but, since he was at once pronounced insane, by the prison doctors, he could not legally be placed on trial, and was accordingly sent to Broadmoor, without the details of his crime and capture being published.

The authorities knew that his capture would not appease the public, who would demand his execution, which was impossible owing to his insanity. He passed in Broadmoor under the name of Taylor, although that was not his real name. Like Jack the Ripper, he was regarded as a doctor. Both were exceptionally strong men, and to those who knew all the facts there were many other similarities far too striking to be the work of chance.

Inmates of Broadmoor Asylum have their special friends, and to his intimates Taylor confided a daring plan of escape which he confidently expected to bring to a successful issue.

His assiduous hobby was gardening, the flower-beds he tended being in a somewhat remote part of the asylum's extensive grounds.

He had only a comparatively low wall to climb. If only he could obtain solitude for the purpose, there was nothing between him and freedom. The opportune moment came. He started to climb the wall, helped by a series of inconspicuous footholds which in the intervals of gardening he had managed to contrive. He was already half way up when an iron chisel, which he had taken with him to help him on the other side of the wall, fell out of his hip pocket and crashed on to a glass frame nearby - making sufficient noise to attract attention, so that he was caught in the nick of time to prevent a criminal lunatic of the most dangerous type from being let loose upon the world.

Soon afterwards, perhaps mercifully, he died.

At Broadmoor he was known always as Jack the Ripper, and the curiously similar characteristics of the two men, coupled with other significant circumstances, convinced many persons, including some in high authority, that the mild and amiable "Mr. Taylor" was none other than the arch-murderer of modern times.

That the new Jack the Ripper is no nearer than Dusseldorf is a comfort these autumn nights.



Stephen P. Ryder, Editor
Casebook: Jack the Ripper
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Christopher T George
Chief Inspector
Username: Chrisg

Post Number: 647
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Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 11:42 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi, Stephen:

Many thanks for this article on a Broadmoor suspect. I would agree with you that this might be about James Kelly except that the statement, "Like Jack the Ripper, he was regarded as a doctor" would seem to preclude Kelly who appears to have had the aspect of a working man and a man of low education unlike the man described, if he existed!

All the best

Chris
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Chris Scott
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Post Number: 942
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Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 1:13 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Stephen
Many thanks fo this fascinating article! Do you have any background info on "John Blunt's Monthly" i.e. where and when published?
The article is a curious amalgam of facts that almost certainly relate to James Kelly and others that cannot possibly refer to him. Of course, what would be of most use would be to know the source, this released inmate who gave rise to the story. My guess whould be that this account does refer to Kelly and has been spiced up with half truths and downright fabrications to bring the not very exciting figure of Kelly more into line with the populat image of the Whitechapel monster.
I will be reading this account again carefully with great interest - thanks again
Chris
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Stephen P. Ryder
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Post Number: 3003
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Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 1:59 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Chris(es) -

Actually, I have very little information on John Blunt's Monthly. The person I bought it from said it was a "Right Wing magazine". The issue I have says "No. 3" so it must have been started sometime in mid- to late-1929. Its editor was Horatio Bottomley.

I've been unable to find this publication in any library listed with OCLC, nor have I found any references to it using Google. I expect it is fairly rare and little-known - not surprising considering the paper used to publish this piece is extremely brittle, it literally falls to pieces when you turn a page.

Here's a pic of the front cover:



I agree with Chris Scott's analysis that the basic facts of Kelly seem to be there, perhaps embellished with the notion of a well-read doctor-type since the general public was well-disposed to Jack-as-doctor theories at the time. It would be interesting to note whether any of Kelly's aliases (according to Tully he used many) were "Mr. Taylor". Too bad Mr. Tully is no longer with us, as I believe he would have been able to offer much insight into this article.


Stephen P. Ryder, Editor
Casebook: Jack the Ripper
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Chris Scott
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Post Number: 944
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Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 2:12 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Very interesting!
here is a brief resume of Bottomley's colourful career:

Horatio Bottomley was a colourful character who rose from humble beginnings to become one of the richest men in England, only to lose it all.

Nicknamed "Botty", he had a gift for talking his way out of any situation, and frequently represented himself in the many court cases held against him. He was the owner of a number of major newspapers and the founder and editor of John Bull Magazine. He owned a fine country house in East Sussex and racing stables at Alfriston.

His chief passion was politics and he won a seat as MP for South Hackney. Sadly his misdemeanours caught up with him and, after lengthy and dramatic hearings at the Old Bailey, he was declared guilty and imprisoned for 7 years.

A much fuller account can be found at:
http://www.aftermath.ladybarn.co.uk/horatio1.html

Chris
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Stephen P. Ryder
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Post Number: 3004
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Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 2:16 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

An interesting biography of Horatio Bottomley can be found at:
http://www.aftermathww1.com/horatio1.asp

He seems to have been very popular during WWI, but he ended up defrauding servicemen out of hundreds of thousands of pounds via some sort of corrupt patriotic bond-buying program. He was in prison from 1922 to 1927, and apparently never amounted to much afterwards. I suppose that would mean "John Blunt's Monthly" (begun ca. 1929) never drew any great interest and was likely a failure soon after it was begun.

He died in 1933.

D'oh! Sorry Chris, didn't see your above post until mine had gone through... :-)

(Message edited by admin on March 02, 2004)
Stephen P. Ryder, Editor
Casebook: Jack the Ripper
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Stephen P. Ryder
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Post Number: 3006
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Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 2:27 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hmmm - found two references to the John Blunt magazine... one suggested it was called simply John Blunt, the other that it was "John Blunt's Weekly", later renamed to John Bull.

Bottomley's story gradually fades to black. He was re-elected to Parliament in 1918 but made little impression. He was involved in a new magazine, John Blunt, but it limped to failure. He even embarked on bizarre lecture tours at home and abroad. As he grew older, he seems to have increasingly confused fame, indeed notoriety, with power and ability. He gradually lost the pace of the race.

He died on May 26, 1933, at the age of 73, a frail and poor man. He was cremated at Golders Green Cemetery. One story is widely quoted. He was serving his time working on the mailbags in Wormwood Scrubs. A prison visitor asked: "Sewing, Horatio?" "No," he replied, "reaping."


http://www.camh.net/egambling/issue9/opinion/shears/


Also:

War Bonds were another way of raising funds to pay for armaments and armoured vehicles. Not all these fund-raising schemes were above board. That scoundrel Horatio Bottomley, the publisherof John Bluntís Weekly, later renamed John Bull, went to jail for a war bond scam.

http://www.theautomobile.ndirect.co.uk/PDF2003/03_11_34%20Automobilia.pdf
Stephen P. Ryder, Editor
Casebook: Jack the Ripper
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Christopher T George
Chief Inspector
Username: Chrisg

Post Number: 649
Registered: 2-2003
Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 2:28 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Chris and Stephen

This magazine John Blunt's Monthly of 1929 containing the Jack the Ripper story appeared evidently near the end of Bottomley's life, as noted on the above website,

"[W]hen he was discharged from prison in 1927 he disappeared into obscurity, and one of the last public accounts of him in the London Daily News in September 1932 shows just how far he had descended:

"The strangest turn in the new non-stop variety programme at the Windmill Theatre last night was the appearance of an old man in a dinner suit who walked slowly to the middle of the stage and cast a sad and patient eye upon a puzzled audience. ... he told a little string of anecdotes from his Parliamentary, journalistic and racing experiences ... the occasion had a curiously disconcerting air of pathos."

"He was not destined to enjoy a new career on the halls. Horatio Bottomley died less than a year later in May 1933."

Interestingly the former publisher of the magazine John Bull was the subject of a recent musical in his native Alfriston. Interesting also to note the surface similarly of the name John Blunt's Monthly to the magazine title John Bull -- perhaps Bottomley was trying to resurrect his career?

Best regards

Chris

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Chris Phillips
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Post Number: 217
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Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 2:33 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The British Library's Newspapers Catalogue lists only no 1 of John Blunt's Monthly, dated 15 October 1929, so you have the advantage of them!

It also lists a preceding title, "John Blunt", which must have been a weekly, running for 66 issues from 16 June 1928 to 14 September 1929.

http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/newspapers/welcome.asp

Chris Phillips

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Chris Phillips
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Post Number: 218
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Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 3:24 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Unless my memory is playing tricks, there is a section on Bottomley in Sir Travers Humphreys's "A book of trials".

Chris Phillips

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Paul Williams
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Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 4:08 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In his Unsolved Mysteries (ISBN 0747242127) Colin Wilson mentions Horatio Bottomley when talking about the disapearance of Victor Grayson. He includes a story to the effect that Bottomley once tried to cheat the bookmakers on a racecourse in Belgium by entering six of his own horses and telling the jockeys in which order they should finish. Unfortunately a fog intervened and he lost the bet.
Also according to Wilson Bottomley went bankrupt 269 times, surely some sort of record.
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Jeffrey Bloomfied
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Post Number: 294
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Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 10:54 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bottomley was a remarkable combination of con-man and genuine crusader. He won his first acquittal in 1893, when his firm the Hansard Union went belly up, and he defended himself (before Mr. Justice Sir Henry Hawkins, of all people) on a charge of fraud. Hawkins, no fool, was so impressed by how Bottomley won acquittal, he spoke to him in private after the trial, and recommended he try his luck at the British bar.

Bottomley had been a court stenographer and reporter, so he had watched the best talents at the Old Bailey, and figured out what worked. That is why he did so well in court - until 1922.

He founded JOHN BULL at the turn of the century, and he demonstrated both the worst (right wing politics and xenophobia) and the best in journalism. An example of his best is the superb tongue-lashing he delivered in an editorial (in 1912) addressed to J. Bruce Ismay in the Titanic Disaster. Ismay, the Chairman of the White Star Line (which owned the TITANIC) had been notorious for being almost the only millionaire on that vessel to survive the sinking. While Astor, Guggenheim, the Strausses, Ryerson, and Charles Hays died, Ismay managed to get a seat in a half empty lifeboat. The subject has been debated for nearly a century, as to whether or not Ismay should have died or survived. None did a better job than Bottomley in getting to the root of the issue: he stated that the humblest passenger in steerage on the ship had a larger moral right to the seat in the lifeboat than Ismay did!

He was a member of Parliament several times, even having a small group of members following him. He was highly capable in debate, once even catching Winston Churchill in a negative situation during a debate (Churchill tried to trip up Bottomley by referring to an obscure law, but the sharp Bottomley noted some of Churchill's aides running over to him to show him the sited law, so that Churchill had not been aware of it either - and Bottomley told him so).

The business about Victor Grayson is a darker problem. Grayson disappeared in 1920, many years after he had been a leading socialist member of Parliament. A recent study suggests that Grayson was about to reveal the truth about the sale of honours by Lloyd George and the Liberals in the aftermath of World War I, which would have destroyed the Prime Minister, Bottomley (an occasional ally), and Maundy Gregory (the middle man in the sales). Grayson disappeared in 1920, possibly (if this theory is correct) murdered by Gregory (also suspected in poisoning a wealthy female friend for her estate in 1932), possibly with Bottomley's assistance.

His patriotism in World War I was actually self-interested. A gifted speaker, he gave remarkably affective speeches for recruiting cannon fodder for the Somme, etc. He got well paid for it (extra if he invoked the name of God in the speech). He also wrote a book regarding letters from the trenches. However, his lack of trustworthiness concerning the British Army mutiny at the camp of Etaples, France in 1917
(a mutiny the army did it's best to hide for many decades - led by Percy Toplis, who would be the subject of a fatal manhunt in 1920)turned off many of the Tommies towards Bottomley. The Victory Bond Fraud of 1922 completed their refusal to assist him when he was expected the support of the ex-Veterans.

A fascinating figure. But as crooked as they come.

Regarding Bottomley and the Etaples mutiny, see William Allison and John Fairley's biography of Percy Toplis, THE MONOCLED MUTINEER (Melbourne,
New York, London: Quartet Books, 1978, 1979, 1986).

Best wishes,

Jeff



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Jeffrey Bloomfied
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Post Number: 295
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Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 10:56 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bottomley was a remarkable combination of con-man and genuine crusader. He won his first acquittal in 1893, when his firm the Hansard Union went belly up, and he defended himself (before Mr. Justice Sir Henry Hawkins, of all people) on a charge of fraud. Hawkins, no fool, was so impressed by how Bottomley won acquittal, he spoke to him in private after the trial, and recommended he try his luck at the British bar.

Bottomley had been a court stenographer and reporter, so he had watched the best talents at the Old Bailey, and figured out what worked. That is why he did so well in court - until 1922.

He founded JOHN BULL at the turn of the century, and he demonstrated both the worst (right wing politics and xenophobia) and the best in journalism. An example of his best is the superb tongue-lashing he delivered in an editorial (in 1912) addressed to J. Bruce Ismay in the Titanic Disaster. Ismay, the Chairman of the White Star Line (which owned the TITANIC) had been notorious for being almost the only millionaire on that vessel to survive the sinking. While Astor, Guggenheim, the Strausses, Ryerson, and Charles Hays died, Ismay managed to get a seat in a half empty lifeboat. The subject has been debated for nearly a century, as to whether or not Ismay should have died or survived. None did a better job than Bottomley in getting to the root of the issue: he stated that the humblest passenger in steerage on the ship had a larger moral right to the seat in the lifeboat than Ismay did!

He was a member of Parliament several times, even having a small group of members following him. He was highly capable in debate, once even catching Winston Churchill in a negative situation during a debate (Churchill tried to trip up Bottomley by referring to an obscure law, but the sharp Bottomley noted some of Churchill's aides running over to him to show him the sited law, so that Churchill had not been aware of it either - and Bottomley told him so).

The business about Victor Grayson is a darker problem. Grayson disappeared in 1920, many years after he had been a leading socialist member of Parliament. A recent study suggests that Grayson was about to reveal the truth about the sale of honours by Lloyd George and the Liberals in the aftermath of World War I, which would have destroyed the Prime Minister, Bottomley (an occasional ally), and Maundy Gregory (the middle man in the sales). Grayson disappeared in 1920, possibly (if this theory is correct) murdered by Gregory (also suspected in poisoning a wealthy female friend for her estate in 1932), possibly with Bottomley's assistance.

His patriotism in World War I was actually self-interested. A gifted speaker, he gave remarkably affective speeches for recruiting cannon fodder for the Somme, etc. He got well paid for it (extra if he invoked the name of God in the speech). He also wrote a book regarding letters from the trenches. However, his lack of trustworthiness concerning the British Army mutiny at the camp of Etaples, France in 1917
(a mutiny the army did it's best to hide for many decades - led by Percy Toplis, who would be the subject of a fatal manhunt in 1920)turned off many of the Tommies towards Bottomley. The Victory Bond Fraud of 1922 completed their refusal to assist him when he was expected the support of the ex-Veterans.

A fascinating figure. But as crooked as they come.

Regarding Bottomley and the Etaples mutiny, see William Allison and John Fairley's biography of Percy Toplis, THE MONOCLED MUTINEER (Melbourne,
New York, London: Quartet Books, 1978, 1979, 1986).

Best wishes,

Jeff



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John Ruffels
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Post Number: 186
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Posted on Wednesday, March 03, 2004 - 2:19 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

And of course, for further information on the notorious middleman in the Victor Grayson murder scandal involving Bottomley we need only to turn to the biography of Maundey Gregory by ...Donald McCormick !! I forget the name...
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Jeffrey Bloomfied
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Username: Mayerling

Post Number: 296
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Posted on Wednesday, March 03, 2004 - 9:30 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There is a good study on Maundey Gregory entitled, THE PLAYFUL PANTHER. It was written by Tom Cullen. There is also an old study of the scandal called HONOURS FOR SALE by Gerald MacMillan. A good biographical study on Grayson is LABOUR'S LOST LEADER: VICTOR GRAYSON by David Clark. McCormick's book (written in 1970) was called MURDER BY PERFECTION.

Jeff
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Ken Morris
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Posted on Saturday, June 12, 2004 - 2:02 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Everyone-

While this thread appears to have been dead for a few months I wanted to raise a question. Is it possible to find out if there were any Taylors in Broadmoor? And when they were commited and when they died or anything of the sort? It seems to be the only name from the story that may be able to be found as real. While I agree it is probably Kelly, is it not possible that it could be another man? As someone from the US my whole life I would have no clue how to go about attempting to get inmate records from a place in the UK.

Here's lookin at you kids-
Ken
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Phil Hill
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Posted on Wednesday, December 01, 2004 - 7:39 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Given that other details in the article appear "wrong" - I don't recall any relatives of the alleged victims of JtR receiving letters or postcards, for instance.

To me this (as well as the Bottomley source)undermines the credibility of what follows. My suspicion is that Broadmoor rumours about police interest in an inmate as the Ripper, have been conflated with the Kelly case and then given added "spin" by the journalist.

Whoever "Taylor" may be, Kelly was not a Doctor and was not In Broadmoor for 30 years (though he perhaps should have been!).

To go on the "of interest" pile, I think, until or unless some corroboration comes to light.

Phil
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Jeffrey Bloomfied
Chief Inspector
Username: Mayerling

Post Number: 511
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Posted on Wednesday, December 01, 2004 - 11:38 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Phil,

Actually the best we can say is that if any of the relatives of the victims (or supposed victims) received messages we are not aware of them. The fact is, with the exception of Mary Nichols family few of the descendants of the victims have surfaced. They are starting to, however. Also, in the case of Mary Jane Kelly, we are not sure if that was her actual name or not, and we are uncertain who her relatives were. However, it is one more weight against the actuality of the Ripper writing to the families of the Victims, if Ms Kelly's relatives had received post cards or letters - but (despite the appalling dismemberment of that victim) did not give them to Scotland Yard.

I would imagine that the authorities at Broadmoor would read all letters and postcards sent by the inmates before they were mailed - of course, this would be if the prisoner did not have a secret way of posting the letters by circumventing the legal route. Yet odd things happen. In 1900 Pat Crowe kidnapped the heir to the Cudahy meat packing fortune. In the process of holding the boy for ransom he threatened to blind the boy with acid, or to kill him, if he wasn't paid. Crowe was caught and the boy returned safely to his family. While Crowe spent years in prison, every Christmas he managed to send a Christmas card to his former victim - reminding him of their time together!
I might add that this was in the United States, not Great Britain.

Broadmoor itself had a bad reputation in the late 1920s. The trial of Ronald True, for the murder of a prostitute in 1922, had resulted in that defendant being found guilty but insane (which, apparently, he was). True had some claims (dubious but there) to genteel respectability. At the same time he was tried a very young man, Henry Jacoby, had murdered Lady Alice White in a residential hotel for robbery purposes (which was the same apparent motive for True). Jacoby was found guilty and hanged. Many people came to the conclusion that there was one law for the poor (Jacoby) and one for the rich (True) - no pun intended. Broadmoor was seen as a luxury place (as opposed to say a prison like Wormwood Scrubs). That True was able to afford better experts and legal aid is true. But there was little real proof that Jacoby (outside of being a silly, murderous twit) was crazy. However the public was not in the mood to believe it. Given Bottomley's yellow
journalism background, and his ability to find fodder for his articles that appealed to the lowest public beliefs (I mentioned his xenophobia), he could have made up the entire article to capitalize on the anti-Broadmoor sentiment at the time. After all, the article suggests that Jack the Ripper had a pleasant, albeit restricted, life after his horrible murder spree.

Broadmoor has had a bad reputation in other periods too. When the popular actor, William Terriss, was murdered by an insane actor named Richard Prince in 1897, Terriss's friends and fans were angered that Prince (who boasted of the killing) was found guilty and insane - and sent to Broadmoor. Sir Henry Irving said that if Terriss had not been an actor Prince would have hanged - a bitter statement. Prince would spend the next four decades as "conductor" of the Broadmoor inmates orchestra. When he died in 1933, Ronald True replaced him.

In 1952, John Straffen (a murderer who was sent to Broadmoor) got out, and committed a second murder (and was returned to Broadmoor). The issue again cropped up that there was no reason to preserve the lives of such dangerous killers.

One can make an argument either way. The artist Richard Dadd murdered his father in 1844, and was sent to Broadmoor. He was given paint and easels, and in the forty years before he died he created the masterpieces that he is remembered for. On the other hand, when John George Haigh was arrested for the murder of Mrs. Durand Deacon (his sixth victim in his murders for profit), he asked a police officer what his chances were for getting into Broadmoor (none as it turned out). However, Broadmoor (despite the debate) remains available for the Taylors, Princes, Dadds, and Trues who fit the legal requirement.

Jeff

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