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Ostrog in 1901 Census - John Evest Log Out | Topics | Search
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Casebook: Jack the Ripper - Message Boards » Suspects » Ostrog, Michael » Ostrog in 1901 Census - John Evest « Previous Next »

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Chris Scott
Assistant Commissioner
Username: Chris

Post Number: 1402
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Wednesday, September 22, 2004 - 9:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The profile of Ostrog here on Casebook lists some of his well known aliases:
a.k.a. Bertrand Ashley, Claude Clayton (Cayton), Dr. Grant, Max Grief Gosslar, Ashley Nabokoff, Orloff, Count Sobieski, Max Sobiekski, et alia.

The article also lists the penultimate known fact about Ostrog's life:
1900: Imprisoned for theft of a microscope at London Hospital, Whitechapel. Known to be partially paralyzed by this time.

The relevant press coverage of this case show that Ostrog at this time was using the name of John Evest. All articles are from The Times:

11 December 1900

At Thames, John Evest, 71, who was said to have been a doctor, was charged with stealing a microsope, valued at 20. Detective Sergeant J. Pullen stated that the instrument was the property of Colonel Mulrooney, of the Indian Medical Service, who was at present in India, and was stolen from the medical college of the London Hospital on August 20 last. As soon as the instrument was missed the matter was placed in the hands of the police, who ascertained that it had been pledged at the shop of Mr. John Shepherd Arnold, pawnbroker, Lewisham High road, for 3. On Saturday the accused tried to sell the ticket to a neighbouring chemist for 1, and while standing outside the shop was recognized by Mr. Arnold, who gave him into custody. Sergeant Pullen afterwards found the prisoner detained at Blackheath road station, and said to him, "You have been identified as the man who pawned a microscope in August last." Evest replied, "Quite right; I pawned it, and can give a satisfactory account of it, but I shall reserve my defence." The officer then, "What is your address?" and the prisoner replied, "I have no address here. I live in France, not in England, but I am an Englishman born." On the way to the station the prisoner said, "I bought the moicroscope from Dr. Barrow 18 months ago. He lived at Stoke Ferry, but is dead now. I gave him two pictures for it. I cannot see how any one can swear to it. That is impossible. How could I get it away from the London Hospital without being seen? I have not been to the London Hospital." Mr. James Smith, medical instument maker, of Tottenham Court road, identified the micrscope as the one supplied to the prosecutor, who at that time was studying at the London Hospital. The prisoner was known as an expert medical instrument thief. Evest was remanded.

20 December 1900

London County Sessions - Before Mr. Loveland Loveland, Q.C., John Evest, 71, formerly a medical student, but who has served perms of penal servitude for thefts of medical instruments, was sentenced to five years' penal servitude on conviction for stealing a microscope, value 20, from the London Hospital.

Same date:
(Before Mr. Loveland Loveland, Q.C., Deputy Chairman.)

John Evest, 71, described in the calendar as a doctor, was indicted for having stolen a microscope worth 20, the property of Colonel James Mulroney. The prosecutor, who was an officer in the Indian Medical Service, now serving in India, was in August last studying at the London Hospital. On August 20 the microscope was stolen in some unexplained manner from the hospital, and shortly afterwards it was pawned by the prisoner at the shop of Mr. Arnold, in Lewisham High road. Mr. Arnold, having learned from the police that the microscope was stolen property, afterwards met the prisoner in the street and gave him into custody. The prisoner alleged that he bought it 18 months ago. The jury convicted him. It was stated that the prisoner, who was partially paralysed, had once been a medical student. He, however, had been many times convicted of stealing medical instuments, and had undergone terms of seven and ten years' penal servitude. Mr. Loveland said that if his health was bad he would be well cared for in prison, and would not be set to any work he could not do. He was sentenced to five years' penal servitude.

The use of the name John Evest has enabled me to find him in the 1901 census, at which time he was in Lewes prison, Sussex:

1901 Census:

His Majesty's Prison, Lews St. Anne, Sussex
Prisoner:
John Evest aged 71
Single
Doctor of Medicine
Born at sea, British Subject

I am hoping that this name may finally clear up the date of his death. If that proves to be the case I will post details here
Chris
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Chris Scott
Assistant Commissioner
Username: Chris

Post Number: 1403
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Wednesday, September 22, 2004 - 9:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Out of interest I have searched the census data from 1871 to 1901 and only one other alleged occurence of the name EVEST occurred but when I look at the original return this was a misreading of the name WEST.
Chris
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Chris Scott
Assistant Commissioner
Username: Chris

Post Number: 1404
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Wednesday, September 22, 2004 - 9:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here is the main article about Evest which mentions his background and paralysis:

evest
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Nina Thomas
Sergeant
Username: Nina

Post Number: 50
Registered: 5-2004
Posted on Wednesday, September 22, 2004 - 2:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Chris,

Sugden's introduction to the "The Complete History of Jack The Ripper" mentions this occurrence and Ostrog as the culprit. It also states: Ostrog's imprisonment began in Wormwood Scrubs but he did not complete the term. On September 17 1904 he was released on licence from Parkhurst. He would, he assured the authorities, earn his living as a doctor and he gave his intended address as 29 Brooke Street, Holborn.
Hope this helps in your search for his date of death.

Nina
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Chris Scott
Assistant Commissioner
Username: Chris

Post Number: 2018
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 - 9:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I know I have asked this question before but I was wondering if anyone has any info on this point.
How and when was it assumed or discovered that John Evest, as described in the articles above, is one and the same as Michael Ostrog? I simply cannot trace when this link was made and on what basis.
There is one other point which follows on from this. The profile of Ostrog here on casebook lists the last known fact in his life as:
1904: Released from prison and entered St. Giles Christian Mission, Holborn. Nothing further is known of Ostrog after this time.

Was this release and entry into the Christian mission under the name of Ostrog or Evest?
I would be most grateful for any help or opinions on this point as it is most important for a line of research I am looking into at the moment
Thanks
Chris
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Robert Charles Linford
Assistant Commissioner
Username: Robert

Post Number: 4395
Registered: 3-2003
Posted on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 - 10:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Chris

Maybe the clincher was that "Evest" had served terms of 7 and 10 years penal servitude, just like Ostrog.

Robert
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Chris Scott
Assistant Commissioner
Username: Chris

Post Number: 2019
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 - 11:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Robert
That is a point. What I was basically getting at is whether the identification of Evest with Ostrog was on the basis of logical supposition or whether there was documentary support. So, for example, if he was discharged or admitted to the mission under the name of Ostrog this would strengthen the identification.
Thanks
Chris
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Chris Scott
Assistant Commissioner
Username: Chris

Post Number: 2021
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Wednesday, May 18, 2005 - 9:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have reread the passge in Sugden about the Evest case and he says along the lines that at that time Ostrog was going under the name of Evest. There is no indication as to how this link was made. However, Sugden does say that his information on the whereabouts and actions of Ostrog after 1888 comes from an article in the October 1994 issue of Ripperana. This article was by D.S. Goffee. Therefore the logical thing is to get sight of that article and see what link is made there.
chris

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