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Chris Scott
Assistant Commissioner
Username: Chris

Post Number: 1382
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Friday, September 17, 2004 - 1:53 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have today transcribed an article from The Times which featured inquest evidence given by Crossingham (of "Crossingham's Lodging House", Dorset Street) and this gives some interesting backgound to the lodging houses he owned and how he ran them. This dates from 1901 and refers to the Mary Ann Ausin murder:

20 June 1901

Mr. Wynne E. Baxter, coroner for the Eastern Division of the City of London, resumed yesterday his inquiry at the Stepney Borough Coroner's Court into the death of Mary Ann Austin, aged 28 years, the wife of a stoke, who was fatally stabbed in a common lodging house, 35 Dorset street, Spitalfields, on May 26.
William Crossingham, of 64 Western road, Romford, stated that he owned several lodging houses in Dorset street, White's row and Little Paternoster row. The charge for a double bed was 1s except on a Saturday, when 1s 6d was charged. Henry Moore and his wife were in charge of the house. Daniel Sullivan was a brother in law of the witness's. He would go into 35 Dorset street if he heard of any quarrelling. The lodgers were often quarrelsome on a Saturday night. Sullivan really had nothing to do with 35 Dorset street; and Moore and his wife, who looked after the house, were not in any way under Sullivan's orders. Sullivan was watchman at 8 White's row. No. 35 Dorset street was registered common lodging house, and was subject to certain regulations. No. 8 regulation said - "No keeper of any common lodging house shall allow persons of different sexes to occupy the same sleeping room, except in the case of married couples and children under then years of age."
The Coroner - What attempt do you make to carry out this regulation? - We let them to couples.
The Coroner - Any miscellaneous couples that come along? - Yes.
The Coroner - Then all I say is that you do not carry out this regulation - you do not attempt to.
The witness - What are we to do? We do not ask them if they are married; we should get insulted.
The Coroner - You make no inquiries? - No. If I saw a man and a woman and knew they were not married I should turn them out. We ask them if they are married at times. Plenty of them are married. It is their hotel, the same as a gentleman has in the West end. The witness added that no instructions were given that a man and woman should leave together. He saw no reason why a regulation that a man and woman should leave together should be made. He had been registered for 35 years, and never had a stain on his character.
The Coroner - Do you remember on March 20 this year, at 8 White's row, that a man and woman, both strangers to the deputy, had occupied a room together; that Daniel Sullivan showed them up; that this woman unknown was found dead in her bed? Did that come to your knowledge? - Yes, a fit, I believe, sir.
The Coroner - Do you know that on May 30 a woman, said to have been a former nurse at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, was shown up to a bed at 8 White's row, and that in the morning she was found dead in bed? - Yes, sir.
The Coroner - With all these facts before you do you think that a man and woman should leave together? - Yes sir; it shall be so.
The Coroner - I have, unfortunately, had to hold inquests on a number of people who have lodged in your houses.
The witness - There are only three to my recollection. They come to the lodging houses to die, rather then go to the workhouse. Men have brought their wives to the lodging houses to die.
The Coroner - I suppose you are aware of the evidence given by a number of witnesses of the way in which the police were not called in?
The witness - It was very wrong. Moore had his instructions to call a doctor first and then the police.
The Coroner - When did you first hear of the woman being injured? - On Whit Monday afternoon. My wife came to London at once and went to the police.
The Coroner - Can you understand how it was that every one was told that the woman slept in No 44 and not in No 15? - No, except that the place was in such a horrible state, and they thought it was going to be a hushed up matter.
The Coroner - A hushed up matter! Why they showed me to No 44 after the inquest was fixed. Can you give any reason why 1s 6d should be charged on a Saturday night? - Yes. They come and do their washing and cooking for Sundays.
William Hitchmore, inspector of common lodging houses under the London County Council, stated that he had known 35 Dorset street since November, 1894. His opinion was that no attempt was made to carry out regulation No 8.
One of the witnesses brought out the fact that it was possible for a person to leave the lodging house as early as 2 o'clock in the morning.
This concluded the evidence, and the Coroner said the only possible explanation of no cry for assistance being made by the woman was that she was heavily drunk, or that she had been drugged. With regard to the drink, it was beyond doubt that the woman was a drunkard, and in all probability she was, soon after entering the lodging house that night, in a comatose state from alcohol. The fact that there had been a separation by the husband from his wife on account of her habits naturally attached suspicion to the man; and when Mrs. Moore went to the police and said she recognized Austin as the man who was with the woman on the night of the tragedy he was, of course, arrested. The conduct of the police was thoroughly justified. So far as he could see, however, there was no evidence to make out a prima facie case against Austin at all. The evidence of such a woman as Mrs. Moore was not worth placing any reliance on. The whole of her evidence was perjured, and it would not be safe to rely upon it. No doubt a number of the witnesses had perjured themselves, and only told another story when they were found out. If he was to prosecute every witness who committed perjury in his Court he would not have much else to do. However, it was quite possible for the Public Prosecutor to institute proceedings if he thought fit. He felt that he himself was not capable of taking part in such warfare.
The jury returned a verdict of "Wilful murder against some person or persons unknown," and left the matter in the hands of the police. Detective Inspector Divall, Detective Sergeants Gould and Wensley, and Police constable Woolley were commended by the jury for their conduct of the case.

I have been able to find the following documentd
info about Crossingham so far:

William Crossingham
1901
64 Western Road, Romford, Essex
Head:
William Crossingham aged 54 born Romford - Lodging house keeper
Wife:
Marget Crossingham aged 37 born Tower Hill
Uncle:
George Steel aged 68 born Herongate, Essex - Retired baker
Servant:
Annie Halls aged 20 born Ingatestone, Essex

1881
16-19 Dorset Street
(Common Lodging House)
Head:
William Crossingham aged 36 born Essex - Lodging House Keeper
Wife:
Mary Crossingham aged 45 born London - Lodging House Keeper
Daughter:
Annie Crossingham aged 14 born Surrey

Birth Registered:
Crossingham, William Charles Sept 1846 Romford
Vol 12 Page 232

Marriage:
Sept 1866 - Lambeth
William Crossingham and Mary Robinson
Vol 1d Page 524

and

Sept 1898 - Whitechapel
William Charles Crossingham and Margaret Sullivan
Vol 1c Page 533

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Natalie Severn
Assistant Commissioner
Username: Severn

Post Number: 1152
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Friday, September 17, 2004 - 3:06 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A really fascinating piece of research thanks Chris.I noticed Donald Rumbelow in his new book has a suspect named Timothy Donovan who was a deputy at Crossinghams at the time of the murders .For Rumbelow he is a very strong candidate for the ripper.He was the man who turned away Annie Chapman on the night of her murder.And there are other circumstances that seem to connect him.Anyway it was good to read your piece.
Best Natalie
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AP Wolf
Assistant Commissioner
Username: Apwolf

Post Number: 1377
Registered: 2-2003
Posted on Friday, September 17, 2004 - 5:13 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes, Chris, that made a lively read, and perhaps shows us the inherent unreliability of the majority of the witnesses involved in the Ripper crimes. Almost everyone involved had some minor but important interest to protect from the forces of law and order... and this I suspect includes Mr Crossingham. Dorset Street was the hub of all criminal activity in that area of Spitalfields in the LVP.
Natalie might be interested to know that said Timothy Donovan was tried for the murder of a woman... I can't remember the outcome of the trial.
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Natalie Severn
Assistant Commissioner
Username: Severn

Post Number: 1155
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Friday, September 17, 2004 - 6:23 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi AP,thats very interesting.I didnt Know anything about him until I got the Rumbelow book today.Must try to find out more.
Have been following the thread on Cutbush.Thats also fascinating.Good to see ya AP
Natalie
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Chris Scott
Assistant Commissioner
Username: Chris

Post Number: 1393
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Sunday, September 19, 2004 - 12:23 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi AP and Natalie
Below are two articles from the Times relating to the killing of Mary Donovan:

13 March 1903

Inquest.
At the Stepney Borough Coroner's Court yesterday, Mr. Wynne E. Baxter, Coroner for the Eastern Division of London, resumed his inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of Mary Donovan, aged 35 years, who is alleged to have been stabbed at her home, 27 Lucas street, St. George in the East, on Saturday night last by her husband, Timothy Donovan, a dock labourer, who stands charged wuth the crime. The accused was present in Court in the custody of two warders. Mr. Ridley, solicitor, appeared on his behalf. Dr. Frederick Spurr, of 170 Commercial road, said that he was called on Saturday night to the house where the accused lived. He was shown into a first floot room and saw Mrs. Donovan lying on the floor with her head near the bed. She was fully dressed and quite dead. The blows must have been given by a sharp instrument with great violence, and death was due to injuries to the head, which he described. Dr. Charles Graham Grant, divisional surgeon, gave corroborative evidence. He saw the accused at the station where he said he had been drinking, "but not so heavily as usual." His answers were coherent and in the witness's opinion the man was sane. His hands seemed to have been recently washed. On Sunday the witness examined his clothing, which he found wa stained with blood. From further evidence it appeared that the accused went down to his landlady and said, "I believe I have done it." She said, "Done what?" He replied, "Come and see." They went up together and witness saw the woman lying in the room. The jury returned a verdict of "Wilful murder" against the accused, who was committed for trial on the coroner's warrant.



1 April 1903

Central Criminal Court, March 31.
(Before Mr. Justice Kennedy)

Timothy Donovan, 40, labourer, was indicted for the wilful murder of Mary Donovan, his wife.
Mr. R.D. Muir and Mr. Bodkin prosecuted; Dr. E.P.S. Counsel defended.
The prisoner and his wife lodged in Shadwell. He was of intemperate habits, but his wife was a sober woman. On the evening of Saturday, March 7, the prisoner retured home at 9 o'clock. Soon afterwards he went to the landlady, who was in the kitchen, and said, "I think I have done something; I think I have done it." The landlady asked him what he had done, and he replied, "Go upstairs and see." The landlady went to the room occupied by the prisoner and his wife, and saw his wife lying on the floor with a wound in the neck. A doctor was fetched by the prisoner, and he found that she was dead. The priosner, who was under the influence of drink, was arrested the same night in Shadwell, and made statements to the effect that on his return home his wife threw something at him, and he in a moment of passion picked up a knife from the table and stabbed her. He added that he did not mean to do it, and that it was all done in a moment. It was stated that the prioner always appeared to be on very affectionate terms with his wife, and it was only when he was drunk that quarrels took place.
For the defence, it was contended that there was a drunken brawl, in the course of which the prisoner struck his wife, forgetting that he had a knife in his hand.
The jury found the prisoner Not Guilty of murder, but Guilty of manslaughter.
It was stated that there were 20 summary convictions against the prisoner for assaults on the police, drunkenness, &c.
Mr. Justice Kennedy, in passing sentence, said that the jury had found themselves enabled to take a less severe view of the case. He assumed from their finding that they were of opinion that there was, in fact, not merely drunkenness on the prisoner's part, but that there was a drunken brawl, in which he used the knife on his wife. In any view the prisoner had taken the life of the woman with a knife, and it was a very serious crime that he had committed. He sentenced him to 12 years' penal servitude.

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AP Wolf
Assistant Commissioner
Username: Apwolf

Post Number: 1378
Registered: 2-2003
Posted on Sunday, September 19, 2004 - 2:11 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Chris
it does make you wonder how modern people are able to pursue completely hapless and innocent individuals related to the case who have absolutely no history of violence against women or other law breaking activity whilst we have obviously dangerous criminal manaics around like Donovan and Cutbush... who are quickly brushed aside because they merely stabbed and killed women.
I seek strength in such situations from strong alcohol, just like Timothy Donovan.
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Natalie Severn
Assistant Commissioner
Username: Severn

Post Number: 1156
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Sunday, September 19, 2004 - 4:35 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Chris,
Amazing that he has not been given more attention as AP says.The only thing I would suggest is that he seems to have been happily married apart from the heavy drinking episodes but rowed and became violent on some of these occasions.Will have to give this some thought.Valuable research Chris.
Natalie
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Chris Scott
Assistant Commissioner
Username: Chris

Post Number: 1397
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Monday, September 20, 2004 - 6:34 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The Timothy Donovan sentenced in 1903 for the manslaughter of his wife was described as 40 i.e. born circa 1863. He is cited as having about 20 previous convictions. using his date of birth as a guide, we can isolate the following as possibly relating to some of these convictions.

1) A Times article of 14 March 1878 mentions a Timothy Donovan aged 16 i.e. born circa 1862.

Timothy Donovan, 16, and Edward Callaghan, 28, labourers, were indicted for a highway robbery with violence.
Mr. Kisch prosecuted.
The prisoners and another man not in custody met the prosecutrix, Minnie Thomas, in Osmond street, Brick lane, on the 19th ult. She was knocked down by them and kicked in the side by Callaghan, while Donovan beat her with half a sheep's head that he was carrying. When she recovered herself she found that her pockets had been torn and her money stolen. To a man who spoke to her, and who proved to be a detective, she at first stated that she had not been robbed, as she feared further violence. She was still suffering from the injuries she had sustained.
In defence the prisoners admitted threatening the prosecutrix, but denied the robbery.
The jury found the prisoners Guilty of an assault with violence.
The Recorder said that would not do and he inquired of the jury were satisfied that there had been no robbery.
A Juryman - The money might have dropped from the pocket.
The Recorder - Anything might have happened. It might be that she had no money at all. You see the danger of speculating.
After some further consideration, a verdict of Guilty upon the indictment was returned, and former convictions were proved against both prisoners.
The Recorder said that no one could have listened to the prisoners without being convinced that they were perfectly familiar with the inside of a Court of Justice. He sentenced them to seven years' penal servitude and 20 strokes of the cat each.

2) In a report of 9 September 1884, it looks as though Donovan may himself have been the victim of an assault:

At the Thames Police Court, Patrick Cronin and Alfred Sage were charged on remand with assaulting Timothy Donovan, a labourer, of 5 Gill street, Limehouse, and stealing 5s from his person. At a quarter past 12 on Sunday morning, the 31st of August, William Barry, a young man, living at 55 Brook street, Ratcliff, was walking along Commercial road, when he noticed the prisoners following drunken people about. They found prosecutor lying in a a doorway, drunk and quite incapable. The prisoners walked backwards and forwards sveral times, and Cronin then caught hold of the prostrate man's arms, dragged him from the doorway, and threw him violently over on to his side. Sage put his hand into prosecutor's pocket, took out 14s, which he handed to a female, and then ran away, Cronin following. Barry spoke to Patrick Henwright, a plain clothes constable of the H Division, and Gould, a plain clothes detective of the same division, who went after the priosners and apprehended them. The woman escaped. Mr. Saunders committed the prisoner for trial.


There is one further report, from 11 August 1885, that may be relevant:

At Bow Street yesterday, before Mr. Vaughan, James Donovan was charged, on remand, with Timothy Donovan, for being concerned together in assualting Thomas Mews, a commission agent, and Thomas John Mews, his son. On Saturday, the 1st inst., prosecutors were on board the Camellia, a Thames steamboat, for the prupose of witnessing the race for Doggett's Coat and Badge. After the race they were accosted by a gang of roughs, who demanded money with threats of violence and murder. James Donovan was alleged to have drawn a knife and, flourishing it in the face of the elder Mews, threatened to stab him. He was alleged to have extorted 12s "to get the boys away," and also to have stolen 7s. Mews at the time had 400 in his possession and the evidence showed that the prisoner Timothy Donovan placed his hand in one of the prosecutor's pockets and withdrew it filled with sovereigns, which were thrown on the deck of the boat and picked up by several persons. About 15 was so lost. Another man named Hine, a fishmonger, had 35 stolen from him, but he could not identify either of the prisoners as being concerned in the robbery. He, however, gave evidence of identification in support of the charges preferred by Mews, and confirmatory evidence was given by other witnesses. A man named Godfrey, the second mate of the boat, also confirmed the evidence, and further deposed that several of the gang of roughs escaped in a skiff. He expressed his belief that they had the money that was stolen. An attempt was made to throw Mews overboard, and for this purpose some men raised the bar at the side of the boat, and would probably have effected their object had not witness rushed forward and prevented them. At the time Mews's head and feet were over the side of the boat. He identified both prisoners as assisting in the robbery. They were both committed for trial.




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John Savage
Inspector
Username: Johnsavage

Post Number: 237
Registered: 2-2003
Posted on Monday, September 20, 2004 - 3:38 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Chris,
Facinating stuff coming up on Timothy Donovan, thanks for posting.

If Timothy were robbed of 14s, he must have been doing quite well for a labourer, because if the cost of a doss house was 4d. a night, this would equal 42 nights. Also he would have had more than that to begin with, before getting drunk.

A suspicious sounding character in my opinion, and perhaps a more likely candidate than some?

Best Regards
John Savage
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Richard Brian Nunweek
Assistant Commissioner
Username: Richardn

Post Number: 1075
Registered: 2-2003
Posted on Monday, September 20, 2004 - 4:37 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Intresting,
Three points spring to mind Pearly Poll stayed at crossinghams, her friend was Tabram who may have frequented the establishment, Annie Chapman was turned away from the house by the said gentleman, also Eddowes stayed right across the street from crossinghams, also Mary kelly frequented the place, according to Maxwell.
He has to be considered as a possible judging by his later behaviour.
If of course this is the same Donavan.
Richard.
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Natalie Severn
Assistant Commissioner
Username: Severn

Post Number: 1163
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Monday, September 20, 2004 - 5:21 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Chris for unearthing this.He certainly seems to have been an unsavoury character[if ofcourse its the same man]I thought he was a callous sod turning Annie Chapman away when she was clearly quite ill and it was past midnight.
Anyway maybe it will be possible to find out more eventually.
Natalie
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Chris Scott
Assistant Commissioner
Username: Chris

Post Number: 1400
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Tuesday, September 21, 2004 - 9:52 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Timothy Donovan

The Donovan involved in the manslaughter of Mary Donovan was noted as 40 years of age in 1903 - born 1862 or 1863. The youth of 16 cited for robbery with violence in 1878 would have been born in 1861 or 1862.

Possible marriages -
June 1894 - St Georges East:
Timothy Donovan and Mary Calnan
Sept 1899 - Poplar
Timothy Donovan and Mary Driscoll


I have done a search of the 1881 census data for Timothy Donovan entries born 1862 + or - 2 years. This produced 4 results:

1)
Timothy DONOVAN Head M Male 38 Wapping, Middlesex, England Coal Whipper
Ellen DONOVAN Wife M Female 36 Chelsea, Middlesex, England
Timothy DONOVAN Son U Male 17 Wapping, Middlesex, England Genl Labourer
Mary Ann DONOVAN Daur U Female 15 Wapping, Middlesex, England Machinist
Ellen DONOVAN Daur Female 13 Wapping, Middlesex, England Domestic Servant
John DONOVAN Son Male 11 Wapping, Middlesex, England Scholar
Daniel DONOVAN Son Male 8 Wapping, Middlesex, England Scholar
James DONOVAN Son Male 4 Wapping, Middlesex, England
Julia DONOVAN Daur Female 18 m Shadwell, Middlesex, England
Source Information:
Dwelling 7 Chancery Place
Census Place London, Middlesex, England
Public Records Office Reference RG11
Piece / Folio 0460 / 126
Page Number 24

2)
James DONOVAN Head M Male 44 Cork Pavior
Mary DONOVAN Wife M Female 42 Cork Hawker
Mary DONOVAN Daur U Female 14 St Georges E, Middlesex, England
Timothy DONOVAN Son U Male 17 Whitechapel, Middlesex, England Dock Lab
James DONOVAN Son Male 6 St Georges, Middlesex, England Scholar
Source Information:
Dwelling 49 Splidts St
Census Place London, Middlesex, England
Public Records Office Reference RG11
Piece / Folio 0451 / 24
Page Number 9

3)
Laurence HAYES Head M Male 52 Ireland Bricklayer
Daniel CRAWLEY Boarder U Male 46 Wapping, Middlesex, England Wharf Labourer
George WILSON Boarder U Male 26 Wapping, Middlesex, England Wharf Labourer
Thomas WILSON Boarder U Male 50 Wapping, Middlesex, England Wharf Labourer
Wm. Jno. WILSON Boarder U Male 22 Ireland Wharf Labourer
Jno. BROWN Boarder U Male 60 Scotland Carpenter
Michael MC CARTHY Boarder U Male 26 Wapping, Middlesex, England Wharf Labourer
James MAHONEY Boarder U Male 62 St George, Middlesex, England Brass Finisher
John MAHONEY Boarder U Male 50 Ireland Wharf Labourer
James REGAN Boarder U Male 65 Ireland Wharf Labourer
John HURLEY Boarder U Male 50 Ireland Wharf Labourer
Timothy DONOVAN Boarder U Male 52 Ireland Wharf Labourer
Timothy DONOVAN Boarder U Male 18 Wapping, Middlesex, England Wharf Labourer
Ted GALE Boarder U Male 22 St George, Middlesex, England Wharf Labourer
Frank BURY Boarder U Male 28 Wapping, Middlesex, England Wharf Labourer
Source Information:
Dwelling 3 Upper Well Alley
Census Place London, Middlesex, England
Public Records Office Reference RG11
Piece / Folio 0461 / 63
Page Number 17

4)
Timothy DONOVAN Head M Male 47 St George, Middlesex, England Wharf Labourer
Julia DONOVAN Wife M Female 48 St George, Middlesex, England Wife Of Wharf Labourer
Jerimiah DONOVAN Son U Male 27 St George, Middlesex, England Dock Labourer
Michael DONOVAN Son U Male 26 St George, Middlesex, England Lighterman
Timothy DONOVAN Son U Male 17 St George, Middlesex, England Carman
Margaret DONOVAN Daur U Female 13 St George, Middlesex, England
Charles DONOVAN Son U Male 15 St George, Middlesex, England Odd Work Gen Lab
Mary DONOVAN Daur U Female 10 St George, Middlesex, England Scholar
John DONOVAN Son Male 7 St George, Middlesex, England Scholar
Source Information:
Dwelling 2A Grocers Place
Census Place London, Middlesex, England
Public Records Office Reference RG11
Piece / Folio 0461 / 66
Page Number 23



However, the 1878 report on the 16 year old Timothy Donovan reported that he was sentenced to 7 years penal servitude, and so we would not expect him to be at liberty by 1881. So, I was looking for a 19/20 year old Donovan who was still in confinement in 1881. There is only one:
Timothy DONOVAN
Male
Other Information:
Birth Year <1861>
Birthplace St Giles, Middlesex, England
Age 20
Occupation General Labourer
Marital Status U <unmarried>
Head of Household William HARRISON
Relation Convict
Disability
Source Information:
Institution "Convict Prison" Parkhurst I O W
Census Place Carisbrooke, Hampshire, England
Public Records Office Reference RG11
Piece / Folio 1177 / 108
Page Number 25

I am pretty confident that this is the young Timothy Donovan sentenced in 1878.

So where was Donovan in 1891? The most likely sighting for the Donovan who was to kill his wife is:

101 Sutton Street. St George's in the East
Head:
Timothy Donovan aged 27 born Shadwell - Dock Labourer
Wife:
Mary Donovan aged 27 born Whitechapel - Factory Hand

If Donovan was 40 in 1903 this cretainly fits agewise.

The only Timothy and Mary Donovan I can place in 1901 were living at 27 Lucas Street, St George in the East. He is described as a coal porter and she as a taioloress and both are given as aged 34. I think it unlikely this is the same couple as given above in 1891 but from the address as given at the inquest this definitely the coupld involved in the manslaughter case.












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d g cornelius
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, September 20, 2004 - 11:11 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ripperati:

"...while Donovan beat her with half a sheep's head that he was carrying." Bring this man to the attention of art historians. He not only anticipated Damien Hirst, but Hirst as a performance artist.

respex,
d g cornelius
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Lenny Picker
Police Constable
Username: Mycroft

Post Number: 2
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Thursday, October 28, 2004 - 10:33 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

With apologies if I missed the reference, but could someone give me details on the new Rumblelow book that advances Donovan as a suspect? My searches on bn.com and amazon, both us and uk did not turn up anything more recent than a several-year-old updated edition of the Complete JTR.

Thanks

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