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William Marshall

William Marshall, examined by the Coroner, said: I reside at No. 64, Berner-street, and am a labourer at an indigo warehouse. I have seen the body at the mortuary. I saw the deceased on Saturday night last.
[Coroner] Where? - In our street, three doors from my house, about a quarter to twelve o'clock. She was on the pavement, opposite No. 58, between Fairclough-street and Boyd-street.
[Coroner] What was she doing? - She was standing talking to a man.
[Coroner] How do you know this was the same woman? - I recognise her both by her face and dress. She did not then have a flower in her breast.
[Coroner] Were the man and woman whom you saw talking quietly? - They were talking together.
[Coroner] Can you describe the man at all? - There was no gas-lamp near. The nearest was at the corner, about twenty feet off. I did not see the face of the man distinctly.
[Coroner] Did you notice how he was dressed? - In a black cut-away coat and dark trousers.
[Coroner] Was he young or old? - Middle-aged he seemed to be.
[Coroner] Was he wearing a hat? - No, a cap.
[Coroner] What sort of a cap? - A round cap, with a small peak. It was something like what a sailor would wear.
[Coroner] What height was he? - About 5ft. 6in.
[Coroner] Was he thin or stout? - Rather stout.
[Coroner] Did he look well dressed? - Decently dressed.
[Coroner] What class of man did he appear to be? - I should say he was in business, and did nothing like hard work.
[Coroner] Not like a dock labourer? - No.
[Coroner] Nor a sailor? - No.
[Coroner] Nor a butcher? - No.
[Coroner] A clerk? - He had more the appearance of a clerk.
[Coroner] Is that the best suggestion you can make? - It is.
[Coroner] You did not see his face. Had he any whiskers? - I cannot say. I do not think he had.
[Coroner] Was he wearing gloves? - No.
[Coroner] Was he carrying a stick or umbrella in his hands? - He had nothing in his hands that I am aware of.
[Coroner] You are quite sure that the deceased is the woman you saw? - Quite. I did not take much notice whether she was carrying anything in her hands.
[Coroner] What first attracted your attention to the couple? - By their standing there for some time, and he was kissing her.
[Coroner] Did you overhear anything they said? - I heard him say, "You would say anything but your prayers."
[Coroner] Different people talk in a different tone and in a different way. Did his voice give you the idea of a clerk? - Yes, he was mild speaking.
[Coroner] Did he speak like an educated man? - I thought so. I did not hear them say anything more. They went away after that. I did not hear the woman say anything, but after the man made that observation she laughed. They went away down the street, towards Ellen-street. They would not then pass No. 40 (the club).
[Coroner] How was the woman dressed? - In a black jacket and skirt.
[Coroner] Was either the worse for drink? - No, I thought not.
[Coroner] When did you go indoors? - About twelve o'clock.
[Coroner] Did you hear anything more that night? - Not till I heard that the murder had taken place, just after one o'clock. While I was standing at my door, from half-past eleven to twelve, there was no rain at all. The deceased had on a small black bonnet. The couple were standing between my house and the club for about ten minutes.
Detective-Inspector Reid: Then they passed you? - Yes.
A Juror: Did you not see the man's face as he passed? - No; he was looking towards the woman, and had his arm round her neck. There is a gas lamp at the corner of Boyd-street. It was not closing time when they passed me.

-- The Daily Telegraph, Saturday, October 6, 1888

William Marshall said:- I live at 64 Berner-street, Commercial-road, and am a labourer. On Sunday last I saw the body of deceased in the mortuary. I recognize it as that of a woman I saw on Saturday evening about three doors off from where I am living in Berner-street. That was about a quarter to 12. She was on the pavement opposite No. 63, and between Christian-street and Boyd-street. She was standing talking to a man. I recognize her both by her face and dress.
The CORONER. - Was she wearing a flower when you saw her? -No.
The CORONER. - Were they talking quietly? -Yes.
The CORONER. - Can you describe the man? -There was no lamp near and I did not see the face of the man she was talking to. He had on a small black coat and dark trousers. He seemed to be a middle-aged man.
The CORONER. - What sort of cap was he wearing? - A round cap with a sort of peak to it; something like what a sailor would wear.
The CORONER. - What height was he? - About 5ft. 6in., and he was rather stout. He was decently dressed, and I should say he worked at some light business, and had more the appearance of a clerk than anything else.
The CORONER. - Did you see whether he had any whiskers? - From what I saw of his face I do not think he had. He was not wearing gloves, and he had no stick or anything in his hand.
The CORONER. - What sort of coat was it? - A cut-away one.
The CORONER. - You are quiet sure this is the woman? -Yes, I am. I did not take much notice of them. I was standing at my door and what attracted my attention first was her standing there some time, and he was kissing her. I heard the man say to deceased. "You would say anything but your prayers." He was mild speaking, and appeared to be an educated man. They went down the street.
The CORONER. - Would they pass the club? -They had done so.
The CORONER. - How was she dressed? - In a black jacket and black skirt.
The CORONER. - Were either of them worse for drink? - They did not appear to be so. I went in about 12 o'clock and heard nothing more until I heard "Murder" being called in the street. It had then just gone 1 o'clock.
A juryman. - How long were you standing at the door? - From 11:30 to 12.
A juryman. - Did it rain then? - No, it did not rain until nearly 3 o'clock.
The Foreman. - What sort of bonnet had she on? - I believe it was a small black crape one.
Inspector Reid. - When you saw them first they were standing between your house and the club? - Yes, and they remained there for about 10 minutes. They passed me once, and I could not see the man's face, as it was turned towards the deceased. There was a lamp over No. 70.
Inspector Reid. - Were they hurrying along? - No.
Was it raining at the time? - No, it was not.

-- Times [London] - 6 October 1888

William Marshall, 64, Berner-street, Commercial Road, said he saw the deceased on Saturday night at a quarter-past 11 talking to a man between Fairclough-street and Boyd-street. The man was about 5ft. 6in. in height, middle-aged, and rather stout, and had the general appearance of a clerk. He was not like a man who did work, or a sailor, and he spoke as if he were well educated. Witness heard him say "You'd say anything but your prayers." He was wearing a black cutaway coat, dark trousers, and a cap with a peak. He could not say if the man had whiskers, as he could not see his face. They stayed talking about ten minutes, and the man had his arms round her neck.

-- Manchester Guardian - 6 October 1888


Related pages:
  William Marshall
       Dissertations: Anything But Your Prayers: Victims and Witnesses on the N... 
       Message Boards: William Marshall 
       Press Reports: Times [London] - 6 October 1888